Architecture

The Conservatoire's inclusion in the Villette site is closely linked to the project to create a multicultural experimental site at the Cité de la Musique. Decided by the French President François Mitterand in 1983, the project was entrusted to the architect Christian de Portzamparc, who won the architectural bid in 1985, with a goal of creating luminous, open spaces, designed to  facilitate encounters.

The Conservatoire’s inclusion in the Villette site is closely linked to the project to create a multicultural experimental site at the Cité de la Musique. Decided by the French President François Mitterand in 1983, the project was entrusted to the architect Christian de Portzamparc, who won the architectural bid in 1985, with a goal of creating luminous, open spaces, designed to facilitate encounters.

Conservatoire Facilities

Conceived to offer classroom, rehearsal and performance spaces to Conservatoire students, the 34 000 m² building includes numerous areas geared to hosting your events, be they conferences or seminars, and including 3 concert halls. With 120 to 350 seats, these halls provide state of the art audiovisual equipment, and are situated next to reception areas for cocktails or dinner parties, which can also take place in the Conservatoire gardens.

Amphitheatres and rehearsal rooms can be used to facilitate smaller, specific meetings needs.

The Building

The relocation of the Conservatoire was a natural extension of the project to create a “City of Music” devoted to multicultural experimentation on a single site. Construction of this project, decided in 1983 by President François Mitterrand, was entrusted to Christian de Portzamparc, winner of the architecture competition in 1985. 

His idea was to divide the site into distinct functional areas, teaching and research with the Conservatoire (opened in 1990) and production/performance and information with the Cité de la Musique to the East.

The challenge facing the architect was to design a building that would let in as much light as possible and facilitate encounters among its users. 

“The building as a whole is divided into four blocks running north-south and separated by corridors of light. [...] The rooms are arranged in acoustically insulated sub-assemblies, connected up by meeting places and open, well-lit, fluid and resonant passageways [...] This solution allowed easy circulation while at the same time satisfying acoustic insulation specifications that prevented certain superimpositions.”

Christian de Portzamparc

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